Torched. A Russian shipyard worker breaks down a large bulge section of a Russian Oscar Class submarine at the Little Star shipyard in Severodvinsk, Russia.
Torched. A Russian shipyard worker breaks down a large bulge section of a Russian Oscar Class submarine at the Little Star shipyard in Severodvinsk, Russia.
(DoD photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Todd P. Cichonowicz, US Navy)
Courier
Change Coming
It’s Time to Rethink US Nuclear Posture
Amid renewed calls for eliminating nuclear weapons, Stanley Foundation analyzes issues behind US strategy

It’s time for a quiz. Please answer the following questions: How many nuclear weapons does the United States have today? What is their utility? Given the necessary scenario, how would we deliver them? What is that “necessary scenario”? How do nuclear weapons fit into our current thinking on national security? Are nuclear weapons useful in the war against terrorism? How many nuclear weapons do other countries have? How do they intend to use them? How do we influence others’ nuclear decisions? And by the way, didn’t we take care of all these issues at the end of the Cold War?

The surprising overarching answer to all these questions is that in 2007, in a post-Cold War, post-9/11, post-Iraq war, post-Inconvenient Truth world, when so much has changed about the way we think about global threats, international security, and our own US security within it, very little has changed in US nuclear weapons policy since 1991.


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This page is part of Rising Powers: The New Global Reality, a project from the Stanley Foundation.